In part one of this two-part blog series on entrance door security, we talked about the fact that not all types of door offer the same peace of mind when it comes to keeping you safe inside, and keeping intruders out. Some entryways, like the patio doors we discussed in the last post, can be more prone to risk. And certain types of property, such as basement flats – also covered in part one – can pose higher risks.

Here in part two we’re continuing the theme, starting with a look at what can be done to secure recessed front doors, then moving on to the subject of entrance doors in houses in multiple occupation, which need a great deal of consideration when it comes to meet regulations.

Recessed Entrance Doors

If your front door is set back into an open porch then you may find yourself at a disadvantage as an intruder may be able to buy time to work at forcing it open without being seen from the street, particularly if the front of the house is concealed by hedges or there are no houses opposite.

The ideal solution to this issue is to close off the porch by adding a secure door to the front. This way you get to extend your living space whilst boosting security. As we always say, following recommendations on security and safety standards when selecting an appropriate external door is essential. For example, doors that are PAS 24:2012 certificated with British Standards compliant multipoint locks will offer greater peace of mind and will prove a wise, long lasting investment.

Entrance Doors to Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMOs)

Houses in multiple occupation (HMO) are subject to a raft of fire and safety legislation due to the fact that death rates by fire in such buildings are up to six times higher than in houses of single family occupation. For this reason it is essential to discuss any planned work with your local Building Control officer to ensure regulations are met.

Because more than one family will be using the same entrance door, it cannot be fitted with a lock operated by a key on the inside otherwise it would be possible for residents to lock each other out.

Entrance doors in HMOs usually have to be fitted with automatic deadlocking rim night latches or mortice sash locks that meet British Standard 8621. These have turn knobs on the inside rather than a key lock. A letterbox hood or reflector should be fitted to prevent an uninvited caller accessing the turn knob. A security grille fitted to the back of glazed panels will do the same job.

If the door opens outwards, a pair of hinge bolts should be fitted and a door closer too, to ensure automatic closing. The door should ideally feature a solid core construction to allow mortice locks to be installed and to provide adequate resistance in the event of an attempt to force it open.

In an ideal world and if budget allowed, you would replace an older entrance door to an HMO for one that is certificated to PAS 24:2012 incorporating a multipoint lock with a thumb turn and handle. For even greater fire safety and security, look out for a multipoint locking door that automatically throws the bolts as soon as the door closes.

There are numerous other measures that can be undertaken to enhance the security of HMOs and we’d be delighted to offer advice on an individual basis.

Door Security Advice

A good, solid door is your first line of defence against an intruder. Whether you have a very specific need for which a tailored solution is required, you are bound by regulations when planning security measures, or you just need general advice, we’re here to help. Our London showroom is staffed by friendly security experts who are available to answer any questions and provide all the advice you need. You can also give us a call or drop us a line. And don’t forget to read part one of this series! We look forward to speaking to you.